The Coolness of Telemedicine – Chris DiBona

We grew up watching medical droids, tricorders and stasis chambers as mainstays in futuristic medicine but it wasn’t that long ago that bionics, the hypospray and telemedicine were also merely science fiction. While there aren’t many open APIs or much rapid product development, the IT revolution hasn’t left the medical industry behind completely.

Chris DiBona takes us on a tour of the near future with his visit to the annual American Telemedicine Association Exposition and talks about the state of IT in the latest medical gear.

About Chris DiBona

Chris DiBona - Ignite Seattle 6Chris DiBona is the Open Source Programs Manager for Google, which includes running the Summer of Code, releasing open source software on Google’s Code website and contributing to several og Google’s blogs. He also helps plan the annual Sci Foo Camp with Tim O’Reilly and Nature’s Timo Hannay.

You can find Chris writing on his personal blog, Egofood or on Twitter @Cdibona in his spare time (spare time?).

Humblefacturing a Sustainable Electronic Future – Dominic Muren

We geeks love our personal tech. iPhones, Kindles, and netbooks – these are the things we are quick to buy, and quick to trade up to stay on the bleeding edge. But in our wake we leave mountains of discarded, useless, and toxic ex-electronics. We have accepted this cycle of perpetual desire, momentary fulfillment, and discarding to chase new desires as the inevitable cost of technological life. But must this necessarily be the case?

Humblefacture is a movement to better understand how the way we make things affects our society and the environment. Using this understanding, practitioners of Humblefacture aim to make things more safe, useful, and accessible to more people.

Dominic Muren shows us how modular design, biologically-inspired construction, and user fabricated components can be used to create consumer electronics which go beyond “green materials” to create truly sustainable manufacturing.

About Dominic Muren

Dominic MurenDominic Muren is a full time lecturer in Design Studies in the Department of Design in the School of Art at the University of Washington. He has written extensively on design and how it relates to society, both online as a writer for Treehugger.com, and on the weblog IDFuel.com.

You can find Dominic at @dmuren on Twitter, his Web site, dmuren.com, or on the bookshelves with “Green’s Not Black & White: The Balanced Guide to Making Eco Decisions,” published in May 2009.

Knitting in Code – Beth Goza

Remember the joy of writing your first Hello World application? Do you still have a copy somewhere so you can gaze upon your coded baby steps into the world of binary goodness? In knitting, creating something beautiful is just like binary, with a series of knits and pearls you can dream up the most sophisticated of patterns.

In the spirit of hi-tech meets hand-tech, Beth Goza will show you how to convert your binary Hello World app into a pattern of stitches (think knit =1 purl = 0), so that you can create, mount, frame and hang your Hello World genius for all to see.

About Beth Goza

Beth Goza - Ignite Seattle 6You can find Beth at bethgo on Twitter, on her blog. During the day, Beth works at T-Mobile on the devPartner Community team.

Beth also gave the “Is 2008 the year the “Third Screen” Takes Center Stage?” Ignite talk in August of 2007 and she will be speaking at the 2009 Gnomedex.

How and Why to Give an Ignite Talk – Scott Berkun

Editor’s Note – this post is completely ripped off of Brady’s post on the Ignite main site.

Scott Berkun is a great public speaker. He travels the country speaking on project management, innovation, design and lately on how to speak. As an offshoot in his research on his upcoming book he put together this Ignite talk on Why and How to Speak.

He’s summarized the talk in this excellent blog post on Speaker Confessions (where he’s chronicling his new book):

  • 300 seconds kicks ass. This is super short, which means it’s easy to practice . There is no excuse for not practicing until it feels good. It also means you have to be tight in your points. 300 seconds equals 10 television commercials. You can make great points in a short time if you refine your thoughts. The entire sermon on the mount can be read in about 5 minutes and The Gettysburg address takes about 2 and a half minutes.
  • Figure out your points before you make slides. Talking about something for five minutes is easy – really, give it a shot once or twice before you make a slide – it will help you sort out what you want to say. You only need Four or five solid points to go 5 minutes. And practice with a timer before you make a slide. You’ll quickly discover how unlikely it is to run out of things to say during an ignite talk.
  • It is ok to breathe. There is no law that says you must fill every second with talking. When you practice, practice breathing. Take a moment between points. Like whitespace in visual design it’s the pauses that make what you do say stand out clearly. Give yourself a slide or two that’s for just for catching up and taking a breath.
  • Pick strong stories and big themes. What do you love? What do you hate? What is the best advice anyone ever gave you? Pick stories with big themes, since they require less introduction. What are the 5 most important things to know about X that no one talks about? The stronger the topic & title the easier the work is. Top 10 lists can work, but making 10 points is extremely hard – aim for 5 or 6.

He’s got several more points at his site.

How to Break Up With Someone On Twitter – Jason Preston

Expressing one’s self on Twitter involves summarizing, editing, and jettisoning the unimportant. We need to strip our thoughts down to the bare minimum, while most importantly, retaining the meaning.

For the more verbose of us, Twitter’s 140 character limit poses a challenge for conveying something as simple as where you are and what you are doing. But what about communicating something much more complex, like breaking up with someone?

Jason Preston navigates you through the world of minimizing the complex feelings, thoughts and action items associated with breaking up with someone in less than 140 characters.

In this instructive how-to video, you’ll build your Twitter toolbox with the following editing tactics:

  • Acronymisying
  • Pictifying
  • Thesaurizing
  • Clppng

and if necessary, you can gain the ability to break up with someone on Twitter.

About Jason Preston

Jason PrestonJason Preston is currently the Director of New Media at Parnassus Group, the company responsible for the 140 | The Twitter Conference.

You can find Jason at Jasonp107 on Twitter, on his blog or his thoughts about the future of publishing at Eat, Sleep, Publish. Jason was recently interviewed by Scott Berkun about this talk here.

Community Genius: Leveraging Community to Increase your Creative Powers – Shelly Farnham

Are you in a creative rut? Finding yourself not as inspired as you’d like to be? Most of us in creative fields need to recharge our resourcefulness every now and then.

Shelly Farhham, social scientist and leading expert in community technologies, has spent her professional life researching social media and building online communities.

In her talk, Shelly shares 13 tips to increase your creative powers ranging from (1) Seek Diversity to (8) give away ideas freely to (7) hang around in bars and helps you figure out how leverage community to increase your creative powers.

About Shelly Farnham

Shelly D. Farnham has a PhD in Social Psychology from University of Washington and is the co-founder and social architect at Waggle Labs, which develops innovative social applications. You can find her on Twitter at shellyshelly.

You can see Shelly’s slides on Slideshare and read the text on the Waggle Labs’ blog.

Hillel Cooperman and the Secret Underground World of Lego

Kids give you license to be kids again. For Hillel Cooperman and his wife, this gave them license to go to Lego conventions, bid on Lego auctions and even turn rooms of their house into Lego rooms.


Note: this Ignite Seattle talk may contain language that is not safe for work (but then you probably shouldn’t be goofing off either).

About Hillel Cooperman

You can find Hillel hanging around the Jackson Fish Market or putting on the “Small and Special” conference, a “tiny conference for small business owners and entrepreneur hopefuls.” You can follow Hillel’s personal exploits on Twitter and his blog or learn more about his obsession with Lego.